The Rental Assistance Demonstration (“RAD”) is well known for the option to convert public housing subsidy to a long-term Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments contract (“HAP Contract”) — but RAD also allows owners to convert their Moderate Rehabilitation (“Mod Rehab”) and Moderate Rehabilitation Single Room Occupancy (“SRO”) contracts to a Section 8 HAP Contract.  HUD estimates that there are over twenty thousand units of Mod Rehab and SRO units across the country with no cap on the number of units that can convert through RAD (see database of units here).

Converting Mod Rehab and SRO contracts to long-term Section 8 HAPs through RAD can present advantages to both the owners of the project and the public housing authorities (“PHA”) that administer the existing contracts.  Below are just a few of the possible benefits for owners and PHAs:

Benefits to Owner:
Long-term RAD HAP Contract:

  • Likely higher rents
  • Provides stability
  • Can be used to secure/leverage financing for rehabilitation
  • Preserve affordable housing
Benefits to PHAs:
For Project Based Voucher (PBV) conversions:

  • New vouchers added to PHA’s Annual Contributions Contract (ACC)
  • PHA receives ongoing administrative fee
  • Contract administration responsibilities align with standard PBV program

For Project Based Rental Assistance (PBRA) conversions:

  • HUD administers HAP contract
  • PHA relieved of contract administration

Ballard Spahr recently hosted a webinar with HUD on the RAD conversion process for Mod Rehab and SRO projects.  You can find a recording of the webinar and the associated slides on the Ballard Spahr website.  We are happy to answer and questions you might have on the conversion process.

 

July is right around the corner and we wanted to remind everyone of the HUD deadlines for closing RAD conversions by year end:

Required Action Deadline to close by
November 30, 2018
Deadline to close by
December 31, 2018
Upload all required Financing Plan
documents*
June 15 July 13
Receive a HUD-executed RCC** August 17 September 14
Submit complete closing package** September 1 October 1
All RAD documents approved and ready for HUD signatures** November 15 December 13

* Note: FHA applications should be submitted at roughly the same time as the Financing Plan documents. PHAs should coordinate with their FHA lender to stay on track.

** Note: An RCC that has already been extended up to or beyond 6 months past the date of issuance will have a lower priority for closing during CY2018.

These deadlines don’t always align with standard low income housing tax credit closings and can sneak up quickly.  Keep the following tips in mind to manage a successful year end conversion:

  • Know the RAD checklists (PBV and PBRA) and what transaction documents must be submitted to HUD.
  • Work out any title and survey issues before HUD submission.
  • Establish a detailed RAD timeline and engage with financing partners as soon as possible on the timeline.
  • Share the HUD-required ownership and control provisions that must be included in transaction documents with financing partners prior to the circulation of draft documents.
  • Share the HUD sample RAD Subordination Agreement with lenders as soon as possible.
  • If necessary, consider prioritizing circulation and review of transaction documents that must be submitted to HUD.
  • Account for the time between receiving final HUD approval and HUD signing and mailing documents – this can take over a week.
  • Aim to make an initial submission to HUD within 2 weeks of RCC issuance (if not sooner). A submission beyond 2 months of RCC issuance will have the transaction placed in “Delayed Submission” status.
  • Make HUD aware of any targeted and hard closing deadlines.

Cheers to a smooth year end!

Yesterday, the Trump administration released its proposed budget for the 2019 fiscal year. Overall, the budget proposes an $8.8 billion (18.3%) reduction in the HUD budget from the 2017 enacted level, a more drastic cut than the $6 billon HUD budget reduction the Administration proposed for fiscal year 2018. Significant proposals in the budget include:

  • Elimination of several programs including the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership Program, Public Housing Capital Fund and Choice Neighborhoods
  • $17.5 billion in Section 8 annual contribution contract renewals (an $800+ million decrease from 2017 enacted level)
  • $10.866 billion in project-based rental assistance (a $50 million increase from the 2017 enacted level)
  • $110 million decrease in Housing Choice Voucher administrative fees
  • $100 million request for the Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program to cover the incremental subsidy for public housing properties that would otherwise be unable to covert to Section 8 assistance
  • Proposed elimination of the unit cap for RAD conversions and September 30, 2020 deadline for RAD application submissions
  • In addition to the elimination of the Capital Fund, $1.7 billion in reductions to the Public Housing Operating Fund
  • $75 million request for the Family Self-Sufficiency program (same as 2017 enacted level)
  • $10 million request for the Jobs Plus Initiative (a $5 million decrease from the 2018 Senate recommendation)
  • Maintained funding levels for lead-based paint mitigation efforts
  • Unspecified funding request to evaluate and improve the EnVision Centers recently launched by Secretary Carson
  • $20 million increase to the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) operations (although a new fee would be imposed on FHA lenders)
  • Requirement that non-disabled persons receiving HUD assistance contribute more than 30% of their adjusted income to their housing costs

Other housing and community development components of this budget include an elimination of the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund grant and direct loan program, $1.8 billion request for veteran’s homelessness programs, and a funding increase for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) single family housing guaranteed loan program. A full copy of the budget proposal and related materials are available at be www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget.

Remember that Congress is responsible for passing the budget; this is just a proposal. It remains to be seen if Congress will adopt the President’s proposal. We will continue to provide updates the budget throughout the appropriations process.

 

On Thursday, November 9, 2017 HUD hosted a live webinar to provide an overview and discussion of the recently developed Completion Certification and the RAD Minority Concentration Analysis Tool. A video of the webinar can be found here along with slides from the presentation.

Construction Completion Certification. Once construction or rehabilitiation is complete, Section 1.13(B)(6) of the RAD Notice requires that Owners submit a completion certification including a cost certification and other information about compliance with requirements of the RCC.  The Office of Recapitalization recently created a module on the RAD Resource Desk entitled the “Rehab/Construction Completion Milestone” and also posted instructions on completing the certification.   Submitting the Completion of the Rehab/Construction Milestone information should be done no later than 45 days after completion of the work. The new module requires owners to provide information related to the completion of work, residents’ right of return, and Section 3 hiring achieved.  Owners should become familiar with the requested information regardless of where they are in the RAD conversion process to understand what data will be needed to complete the certification, including some information that dates back to the issuance of the CHAP.

RAD Minority Concentration Analysis Mapping Tool. HUD has released the RAD Minority Concentration Analysis Tool (the “Tool”) in order to help housing authorities assess whether a proposed site for new construction under RAD may be in an area of minority concentration.  The Tool will create a report of data required by the RAD Fair Housing and Civil Rights Notice (H/PIH 2016-17), including minority data from the Census for: 1) the Housing Market Area; 2) the census tract; 3) the area comprised of the census tract of the site together with all adjacent census tracts; and 4) an alternative geography if proposed by the housing authority. The Tool is available at https://www.huduser.gov/portal/maps/rad/home.html and requires creating a user account.

As we head into the fourth quarter, HUD sent out an e-mail reminder Friday afternoon about flexibility when establishing Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) contract effective dates in Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) transactions. The January 2017 revision to the RAD Notice at Section 1.13(B)(5) gives Project Owners the ability to establish a HAP contract effective date of either 1) the first day of the month after closing, or 2) the first day of the second month following closing.  For example, this flexibility allows RAD transactions that close in October to have a HAP effective date of either November 1 or December 1.

The fourth quarter has historically been the busiest time for closing RAD transactions, and HUD made this policy change to try to relive come pressure from the November closing schedule. In the reminder, HUD suggested that those with hard November closing deadlines should consider closing in October but maintaining a December HAP effective date. HUD strongly encouraged working toward an October closing if a December 1 HAP effective date is critical to the transaction.

The HUD reminder also reiterated the milestones established by HUD in March for yearend closings:

 

Step

Deadline to close by Nov. 30, 2017 Deadline to close by Dec. 31, 2017
Receive a RAD Conversion Commitment (RCC) August 16 September 15
Submit complete closing package September 1 October 1
All RAD documents approved and ready for HUD signatures November 16 December 14

HUD’s methodology for prioritizing yearend closings are based on several factors, including:

  • Adherence to the deadlines set forth in the table above.
  • Prioritization categories for CHAP processing listed in Section 1.11 of the RAD Notice.
  • Critical deadlines beyond the control of the PHA and its development team (note that HUD will require documentation of these deadlines when considering this factor).
  • Lower priority will be given to transactions when the original RCC expiration date has been extended past 90 days from issuance.

Ballard Spahr will continue to monitor any further guidance issued by HUD regarding yearend RAD closings and update our readers.

HUD’s Office of Recapitalization recently released a memo to all CHAP awardees setting forth closing deadlines for CY 2017 RAD transactions. Awardees should be especially  mindful of these intermediate deadlines to ensure that their RAD projects can be promptly processed.

 

Step

Deadline to close by June 30, 2017 Deadline to close by Nov. 30, 2017 Deadline to close by Dec. 31, 2017
Upload all required Financing Plan documents Completed June 15 July 15
Receive a RAD Conversion Commitment (RCC) Completed August 15 September 15
Submit complete closing package April 15 September 1 October 1
All RAD documents approved and ready for HUD signatures June 22 November 16 December 14

Other key takeaways from the memo include the following:

  • Projects that wish to have RAD rents funded with Section 8 subsidy beginning in January 1, 2018 must close by November 30, 2017.
  • In addition to the priority categories listed in Section 1.11 of the RAD Notice, HUD will prioritize projects adhering to the deadlines and those with demonstrable critical deadlines beyond the control of the housing authority and its development team.
  • HUD may require an update to the Financing Plan and re-issuance of the RAD Conversion Commitment (RCC) if the RCC has aged over 6 months.

 

In an announcement on January 12th, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) published a significant third revision to the Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) Notice (PIH 2012-32/ H 2017-03 Rev-3). According to HUD, the RAD notice was revised in order to maintain the increased pace of RAD transactions in a manner that is consistent and flexible. The revised notice is effective upon its forthcoming publication in the Federal Register, though several eligibility criteria will remain subject to a 30-day public comment period. Some of the substantive changes to the RAD Notice include the following:

  • Project-Based Voucher (PBV) Unit Cap

The revised RAD notice eliminates the standard 25% limit so that there is no longer any cap on the number of units in a project that may receive PBV assistance.  Before this latest modification, RAD allowed up to 50% of the units in a project to receive PBV assistance; provided 100% of the units could receive such assistance if at least 50% of the units were occupied by (i) elderly or non-elderly disabled households or (ii) families receiving supportive services.

  • Resident Notification

The revised RAD notice expanded the notification requirements public housing authorities (PHAs) must give residents at a project identified for conversion. Most significantly, before submitting a RAD application, PHAs must now disclose to residents any preliminary intent to (i) include a transfer of assistance; (ii) partner with a third party entity that will have a general partner/managing member interest in the new project owner; (iii) make changes in the number or configuration of any assisted units; (iv) impose any  change potentially impacting the household’s ability to reoccupy the unit; (v) the scope of work; and (vi) implement any deminimis reduction of units vacant for more than 24 months at the time of the RAD application. PHAs must issue a RAD Information Notice and General Information Notice (if required) according to the RAD Fair Housing, Civil Rights, and Relocation Notice (H/PIH 2016-17)  to inform residents of their rights in connection with the conversion. PHAs are also required to have an additional resident meeting prior to submitting its Financing Plan, and conduct subsequent meetings with residents to discuss any material changes to utility allowance calculations or substantial changes to the conversion plan.

  • Right to Return & Rescreening

Under the new RAD notice, existing public housing residents at a project converting to RAD who will occupy non-RAD PBV units or non-RAD PBRA units following conversion are protected against post-conversion occupancy exclusion due to revised rescreening, income eligibility, or income targeting policies.  Thus, even those public housing residents that will reside in non-RAD units post-conversion will preserve this right to return.

  • Use of PHA Acquisition Proceeds

Any cash acquisition proceeds a PHA receives in excess of seller take-back financing must be used for “Affordable Housing Purposes.” The definition of “Affordable Housing Purposes” is now set out in the definitions section of the Notice and applies in more instances.  The revised RAD Notice defines “Affordable Housing Purposes” as those activities that support the predevelopment, development, or rehabilitation of other RAD conversions, public housing, Section 8, Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) or other federal or local housing programs that either (i) serve households with incomes at or below 80% of the area median income or (ii) provide services or amenities that will be used primarily by low-income households as defined by the United States Housing Act of 1937.

  • Expanded Criteria for Ownership or Control Requirement

The latest revisions to the RAD Notice describes further circumstances under which a public or non-profit entity acting directly or through a wholly owned affiliate can meet the ownership or control requirements, including if it (i) holds a fee simple interest in the land; (ii) is the ground lessor pursuant to a ground lease with the project owner; (iii) has legal authority to direct the financial and legal interests of the project owner with respect to the RAD units; (iv) owns 51% or more of the general partner/managing member interest in a limited partnership or limited liability company; (v) owns less than 51% of a general partner/managing member interest but holds certain HUD-approved control rights; (vi) owns 51% or more of the total ownership interests and holds certain HUD-approved control rights; or (vii) enters other ownership and control arrangements as approved by HUD.

  • Maximum Developer Fee

For LIHTC transactions, undeferred portions of earned developer fee are now capped at the greater of (a) 15% of total development costs less acquisition payments to the PHA, developer fees and reserves; and (b) the lesser of (i) $1 million and (ii) 15% of the total development costs without any offsets for acquisition payments to the PHA, developer fees and reserves. Developer fee limits applicable under the prior version of the RAD Notice continue in effect for all transaction in which the RAD Conversion Commitment (RCC) was issued within 60 days following the current revisions to the Notice and which close prior to the later of 60 days after the revised Notice and 60 days after the RCC.

Developer fee remains subject to the LIHTC allocating agency’s schedule for payment. For non-LIHTC deals, the total earned developer fee can be up to 10% of total development costs less any acquisition costs, reserves, or developer fee payments. The revised RAD Notice also states that earned developer fee is also not subject to any federal restrictions, whereas RAD Notice Rev-2 only stated that it was not to be counted as program income.

  • Capital Needs Assessment (CNA) Exemptions

The revised RAD Notice allows HUD to exempt projects from the need to conduct a Capital Needs Assessment where the total number of RAD and other PBV-assisted units constitute less than 20% of total units at project, or a higher amount at HUD’s discretion. It is also important to note that under this revision, all CNA exemptions listed are discretionary not automatic, and must be confirmed with the assigned RAD Transaction Manager for the project conversion.

To review additional changes made in the latest version of the RAD Notice, HUD has also offered a blackline comparison to Revision 2.  

On November 29, 2016, HUD published Notice PIH 2016-20 (HA) on the subject 2 CFR 200.311(c)(1) Disposition Instructions for the Public Housing Agency (PHA) Retention of Certain Public Housing Real Property (that is no longer used or was never used for public housing dwelling purposes) Free from Public Housing Use Restrictions (the “Notice”).  The Notice covers instances in which a PHA desires to retain particular property rather than sell, transfer or ground lease the property to a separate entity.

A main example for such disposition is property that once comprised public housing dwelling units assisted under Section 9 of the 1937 Act that are no longer receiving the benefit of any Section 9 assistance because the assistance was transferred through the Rental Assistance Demonstration (“RAD”). The Notice provides the following additional examples of public housing property that are eligible for disposition and retention by the PHA under the Notice:

  • administrative buildings, central warehouses, garages, community buildings or other non-dwelling structures that the PHA no longer needs to support its public housing units;
  • vacant land that formerly comprised public housing units that have been demolished with HUD approval under HOPE VI, Choice Neighborhoods grants, or Section 18 demolition under the 1937 Act;
  • “excess” vacant land that was acquired by the PHA with public housing funds from the 1937 Act, but was never developed with units operated as public housing; and
  • “excess” vacant land that was not released from the Declaration of Trust as part of a RAD.

Unless an exception is granted by HUD, a request to retain the property will require the PHA to compensate HUD based on applying the percentage of HUD’s participation in the cost of the original purchase (and costs of any improvements, including subsequent modernization) of the public housing property to the fair market value of the project or property. This calculation will often result in the PHA compensating HUD 100% of the fair market value of the property, since generally public housing property has been funded exclusively with public housing funds.

The PHA can request an exception to the compensation requirement under two scenarios. The first is if the public housing property proposed for retention will include development of rental housing or homeownership units that will be operated as housing affordable to low-income families (e.g., families with incomes at or below 80% of area median income with rents generally not to exceed 30% of 80% of area median income). The second scenario in which HUD will consider an exception to HUD compensation is if retention of the property will allow for a non-dwelling use that primarily serves or supports the service of low-income families.  HUD may require the recordation of a use restriction against the property, typically for not less than 30 years, if HUD grants a compensation exception.

To retain property as described in the Notice, PHAs must submit an Inventory Removal Application Form (HUD-52860) and HUD-52860 Addendum-G electronically and the Notice details the information to be included in the application, which includes, but is not limited to, specific authorization for the retention in the PHA Plan, an estimate of the fair market value based on an appraisal and a letter of support from the chief executive officer of the unit of local government.

As a follow-up to our March 24, 2016 post, on May 16, 2016, Ballard Spahr submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on proposed revisions to documents used in the Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) Program, including the Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) contracts, RAD Use Agreement, RAD Conversion Commitment, and Financing Plan. The proposed revisions to the RAD documents represent substantive changes, as well as the incorporation of established policies and riders into the body of the documents.  A full copy of Ballard’s comments can be accessed here.

All comments on the revised RAD documents submitted to HUD can be found on the Regulations.gov website.

On March 17, 2016, HUD published a notice in the Federal Register to announce that  as part of the process to renew the use of the form documents used under both the 1st and 2nd Component of its Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) Program, HUD is soliciting public comment on the revised,  and in some cases, newly created, documents used by program participants, including the HAP contracts, Use Agreement, RAD Conversion Commitment, and the Financing Plan submission portal.

RAD was created in order to give public housing authorities (PHAs) a tool to preserve and improve public housing properties and address the $26 billion dollar nationwide backlog of deferred maintenance. RAD also gives owners of three HUD “legacy” programs (Rent Supplement, Rental Assistance Payment, and Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation) the opportunity to enter into long-term contracts that facilitate the financing of improvements.  Participation in RAD is voluntary. Participating PHAs and Multifamily Owners are required to submit documentation for the purpose of processing and completing the conversion. Through these documents, HUD evaluates whether the PHA or owner has met all of the requirements necessary to complete conversion as outlined in PIH Notice 2012-32 Rev 2 (June 15, 2015) Rental Assistance Demonstration—Final Implementation Notice (RAD Notice).

The public comment period is open for 60 days at which point HUD will review comments and incorporate changes as appropriate. HUD will then re-issue the documents for a 30-day public comment period.  Comments are due Monday, May 16th.

In particular, HUD proposes to make the following changes:

  1. Inclusion of Fair Housing, Civil Rights and Relocation Requirements in RAD Documents:

Consistent with HUD’s RAD Notice, HUD expects that RAD transactions will comply with fair housing, civil rights and relocation requirements and changes to the proposed documents are meant to assist in compliance therewith.   The changes under consideration include the following:

(i) Modifications to the various Housing Assistance Payments contracts to ensure appropriate enumeration of existing fair housing and civil rights requirements and clarification of such requirements;

(ii) Revision and expansion of the FHEO Accessibility and Relocation Plan Checklist to more comprehensively address all federal fair housing and civil rights reviews identified in the RAD Notice (including those derived from the Fair Housing Act, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, HUD’s Equal Access Rule, and other authorities) and resident relocation compliance issues;

(iii) Revisions to the RAD Conversion Commitment to add certifications and representations to ensure compliance with fair housing and civil rights requirements until and after the RAD closing.

  1. Clarification of Davis-Bacon Standards – HUD is reviewing the Davis-Bacon Standards in the RCC and HAP Contracts to determine whether they are sufficiently clear or if further clarification is needed.

Form documents on which comment is requested include:

Ballard Spahr will be undertaking a review of the proposed forms and anticipates submitting comments with respect thereto.  We welcome thoughts of our clients and friends who may be interested in compiling joint comments.

Comments can be submitted electronically or to the following address:

Regulations Division
Office of General Counsel
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
451 7th Street SW., Room 10276
Washington, DC 20410–0500